Marketing Communications using Film & Video

Tag: Storytelling (Page 1 of 2)

Movie Director Markus Welter A lion tamer in a flea circus of nerds
Bullshit doesn't count

Movie Director Markus Welter: »A lion tamer in a flea circus of nerds«

Markus Welter (48) is not only a successful movie director but also a sought-after editor. A combination of talents he shares with various famous role models. Award winning directors such as James Cameron and David Lynch work as editors too, much like Jean-Luc Godard and Lars von Trier, who have written film history far beyond the bounds of European cinema.

The saying goes: Instead of reaching for the stars you should be guided by them. Markus Welter who instead of working in big Hollywood works in little Switzerland, explains in his conversation with Marianne van der Kooi what film and TV means for him and his family.

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Hot Trends for 2017 … – and what the Good Fairy has to do with it
The Hottie and the Nottie

Hot Trends for 2017 … – and what the Good Fairy has to do with it

At this time of year, as sure a thing as the yearly winter flu virus that sweeps across the country is the fact that many a wise guy will peruse the tea leaves in his tea cup and boldly predict the hot trends that promise to shake the world of communication with film and video this year. And 2017 is no different.

Even though once these stupidities are propagated they seem to catch on, repeating them doesn’t make you any wiser. So as we welcome 2017, Videothink – unlike previous years – will refrain from making its own predictions. Instead of creating a list of trends in visual storytelling, we’ve decided to share with you what should be more aptly titled a wish list, we secretly hope our Good Fairy could grant us.

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Stars in front of the camera: Rules on how to be photogenic
Picture Perfect

Stars in front of the camera: Rules on how to be photogenic

Not everyone and everything looks as attractive through a camera lens as stars and celebrities do. Those who are fortunate enough to have a camera-friendly appearance are described as photogenic. However: Some of us might be blessed with a natural attractiveness which seems to escape the camera lens, making us look a little less than fetching in photos, on film or video. This article explains why.

As the saying goes, the camera never lies. However, that being said, there is the odd inconspicuous-looking person who really shines through a lens. The camera works its magic on these people,  transforming them into stars and enchantingly charismatic personalities. Cameramen talk about how the camera loves an actor or actress, meaning they have the gift of being photogenic.

In film and video, as well as in photography, there are a series of tried and tested rules and tricks that can have a positive influence on the people or objects a camera is pointed at:

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Gorillas and Octopuses

Viewing films and how cinema works in your head

The process of viewing films begins in the director’s mind and ends in the viewer’s head. But what happens before a film reaches its destination in a spectator’s mind is quite amazing. Those of us, who talk about film, commission films or make films for a living, should not only continuously strive to create better films, but of course also contemplate how films are perceived.

This article isn’t about film-set anecdotes or creative processes, storytelling or dramatic narratives. For once two covert protagonists takes centre stage, without which viewing films – and I’m sure no one would contradict me here – would be impossible: the eye and the brain. Even though research and modern technology have now made it possible for us to view a film with our tongue. But before we explain how seeing with tongues works, let’s take a leap back and start from scratch, to where it all begins, at birth.

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Off-Voice and Off-Commentary: What you need to know
How to avoid an off-putting voice-off

Off-Voice and Off-Commentary: What you need to know

Off-Voice and off-commentaries don’t always necessarily improve the quality of a video. They can however often make it worse. A viewer is generally very forgiving. But not when it comes to a narrative voice in off. Here he won’t think twice about exercising his right to make good use of his time…- he chooses to click away. This can be avoided.

This article provides a practical checklist and guide for the correct and professional – and consequently effective – use of voice-off and off-commentary. It is directed at both advert, image films and webvideo creators and at those who commission audiovisual productions for marketing and communication.

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Why subjective perception in film and video really matters
Thrown out with the bathwater

Why subjective perception in film and video really matters

When answering the question of what subjective perception is and could be, one of Switzerland’s most popular daily newspapers had bemoaned the fact that – during the last few years and not least because of YouTube – films and videos were now (quote) “… mercilessly subjective and mercilessly random …” and had lost most of their effect. I beg your pardon? My related comment in this article: this perception is rubbish and an old hat!

Those hammering answers such as these into their computer keyboard not only hinder the knowledgeable person from gaining an insight into the reality of current trends in moving image communication, but also only permit conclusions about their own lack of expertise:

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Editing Film and Video Correctly (2/4): Changing space and time
Changing space and time

Editing film and video correctly (2/4)

During the pioneering times of the film, editing film was limited to cutting the necessary events in their chronological order as required for the narrative. In this case, excitement could not be created by cutting but only by the content of the narrative. Film cutting served reality.

As early as 1901, James Williamson went a step further in his film “Attack on a China Mission”: He discovered that the viewers also let film cutting guide them across larger leaps in time and space if an identical object or person was involved in the setting before and after cutting. 

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Editing films and videos correctly (1/4)
The principle of film editing

Editing films and videos correctly (1/4)

Editing films can be hard like an unexpected slap in the face or soft like a loving look. It can change time and be a complete contrast to movement in front of the camera. The cut can guide the eye or hinder us from seeing something. Therefore, editing films and videos is more than a mere trade, it “additionally” incorporates the potential of a form of art.

The four-part article series on the trade of editing begins with the most important principles of film cutting:

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